Finitely generated modules over a PID

You can use Sage to compute with finitely generated modules (FGM’s) over a principal ideal domain R presented as a quotient V/W, where V and W are free.

NOTE: Currently this is only enabled over R=ZZ, since it has not been tested and debugged over more general PIDs. All algorithms make sense whenever there is a Hermite form implementation. In theory the obstruction to extending the implementation is only that one has to decide how elements print. If you’re annoyed that by this, fix things and post a patch!

We represent M=V/W as a pair (V,W) with W contained in V, and we internally represent elements of M non-canonically as elements x of V. We also fix independent generators g[i] for M in V, and when we print out elements of V we print their coordinates with respect to the g[i]; over \(\ZZ\) this is canonical, since each coefficient is reduce modulo the additive order of g[i]. To obtain the vector in V corresponding to x in M, use x.lift().

Morphisms between finitely generated R modules are well supported. You create a homomorphism by simply giving the images of generators of M0 in M1. Given a morphism phi:M0–>M1, you can compute the image of phi, the kernel of phi, and using y=phi.lift(x) you can lift an elements x in M1 to an element y in M0, if such a y exists.

TECHNICAL NOTE: For efficiency, we introduce a notion of optimized representation for quotient modules. The optimized representation of M=V/W is the quotient V’/W’ where V’ has as basis lifts of the generators g[i] for M. We internally store a morphism from M0=V0/W0 to M1=V1/W1 by giving a morphism from the optimized representation V0’ of M0 to V1 that sends W0 into W1.

The following TUTORIAL illustrates several of the above points.

First we create free modules V0 and W0 and the quotient module M0. Notice that everything works fine even though V0 and W0 are not contained inside \(\ZZ^n\), which is extremely convenient.

sage: V0 = span([[1/2,0,0],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W0 = V0.span([V0.0+2*V0.1, 9*V0.0+2*V0.1, 4*V0.2])
sage: M0 = V0/W0; M0
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 16)

The invariants are computed using the Smith normal form algorithm, and determine the structure of this finitely generated module.

You can get the V and W used in constructing the quotient module using V() and W() methods:

sage: M0.V()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 3 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[1/2   0   0]
[  0   2   0]
[  0   0   1]
sage: M0.W()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 3 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[1/2   4   0]
[  0  32   0]
[  0   0   4]

We note that the optimized representation of M0, mentioned above in the technical note has a V that need not be equal to V0, in general.

sage: M0.optimized()[0].V()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 2 over Integer Ring
User basis matrix:
[0 0 1]
[0 2 0]

Create elements of M0 either by coercing in elements of V0, getting generators, or coercing in a list or tuple or coercing in 0. Finally, one can express an element as a linear combination of the smith form generators

sage: M0(V0.0)
(0, 14)
sage: M0(V0.0 + W0.0)  # no difference modulo W0
(0, 14)
sage: M0.linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens([3,20])
(3, 4)
sage: 3*M0.0 + 20*M0.1
(3, 4)

We make an element of M0 by taking a difference of two generators, and lift it. We also illustrate making an element from a list, which coerces to V0, then take the equivalence class modulo W0.

sage: x = M0.0 - M0.1; x
(1, 15)
sage: x.lift()
(0, -2, 1)
sage: M0(vector([1/2,0,0]))
(0, 14)
sage: x.additive_order()
16

Similarly, we construct V1 and W1, and the quotient M1, in a completely different 2-dimensional ambient space.

sage: V1 = span([[1/2,0],[3/2,2]],ZZ); W1 = V1.span([2*V1.0, 3*V1.1])
sage: M1 = V1/W1; M1
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (6)

We create the homomorphism from M0 to M1 that sends both generators of M0 to 3 times the generator of M1. This is well defined since 3 times the generator has order 2.

sage: f = M0.hom([3*M1.0, 3*M1.0]); f
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 16) to module with invariants (6,) that sends the generators to [(3), (3)]

We evaluate the homomorphism on our element x of the domain, and on the first generator of the domain. We also evaluate at an element of V0, which is coerced into M0.

sage: f(x)
(0)
sage: f(M0.0)
(3)
sage: f(V0.1)
(3)

Here we illustrate lifting an element of the image of f, i.e., finding an element of M0 that maps to a given element of M1:

sage: y = f.lift(3*M1.0); y
(0, 13)
sage: f(y)
(3)

We compute the kernel of f, i.e., the submodule of elements of M0 that map to 0. Note that the kernel is not explicitly represented as a submodule, but as another quotient V/W where V is contained in V0. You can explicitly coerce elements of the kernel into M0 though.

sage: K = f.kernel(); K
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (2, 16)

sage: M0(K.0)
(2, 0)
sage: M0(K.1)
(3, 1)
sage: f(M0(K.0))
(0)
sage: f(M0(K.1))
(0)

We compute the image of f.

sage: f.image()
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (2)

Notice how the elements of the image are written as (0) and (1), despite the image being naturally a submodule of M1, which has elements (0), (1), (2), (3), (4), (5). However, below we coerce the element (1) of the image into the codomain, and get (3):

sage: list(f.image())
[(0), (1)]
sage: list(M1)
[(0), (1), (2), (3), (4), (5)]
sage: x = f.image().0; x
(1)
sage: M1(x)
(3)

TESTS:

sage: from sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module import FGP_Module
sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ)
sage: W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = FGP_Module(V, W); Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: Q.linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens([1,3])
(1, 3)
sage: Q(V([1,3,4]))
(0, 11)
sage: Q(W([1,16,0]))
(0, 0)
sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],QQ)
sage: W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1])
sage: Q = FGP_Module(V, W); Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Rational Field with invariants (0)
sage: q = Q.an_element(); q
(1)
sage: q*(1/2)
(1/2)
sage: (1/2)*q
(1/2)

AUTHOR:

  • William Stein, 2009
sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.FGP_Module(V, W, check=True)

INPUT:

  • V – a free R-module
  • W – a free R-submodule of V
  • check – bool (default: True); if True, more checks on correctness are performed; in particular, we check the data types of V and W, and that W is a submodule of V with the same base ring.

OUTPUT:

  • the quotient V/W as a finitely generated R-module

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: import sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module
sage: Q = sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.FGP_Module(V, W)
sage: type(Q)
<class 'sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.FGP_Module_class_with_category'>
sage: Q is sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.FGP_Module(V, W, check=False)
True
class sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.FGP_Module_class(V, W, check=True)

Bases: sage.modules.module.Module

A finitely generated module over a PID presented as a quotient V/W.

INPUT:

  • V – an R-module
  • W – an R-submodule of V
  • check – bool (default: True)

EXAMPLES:

sage: A = (ZZ^1)/span([[100]], ZZ); A
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (100)
sage: A.V()
Ambient free module of rank 1 over the principal ideal domain Integer Ring
sage: A.W()
Free module of degree 1 and rank 1 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[100]

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: type(Q)
<class 'sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.FGP_Module_class_with_category'>
Element

alias of FGP_Element

V()

If this module was constructed as a quotient V/W, returns V.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.V()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 3 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[1/2   0   0]
[  0   1   0]
[  0   0   1]
W()

If this module was constructed as a quotient V/W, returns W.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.W()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 3 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[1/2   8   0]
[  0  12   0]
[  0   0   4]
annihilator()

Return the ideal of the base ring that annihilates self. This is precisely the ideal generated by the LCM of the invariants of self if self is finite, and is 0 otherwise.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,0,0],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([V.0+2*V.1, 9*V.0+2*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q.annihilator()
Principal ideal (16) of Integer Ring
sage: Q.annihilator().gen()
16

sage: Q = V/V.span([V.0]); Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (0, 0)
sage: Q.annihilator()
Principal ideal (0) of Integer Ring
base_ring()

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.base_ring()
Integer Ring
cardinality()

Return the cardinality of this module as a set.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = ZZ^2; W = V.span([[1,2],[3,4]]); A = V/W; A
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (2)
sage: A.cardinality()
2
sage: V = ZZ^2; W = V.span([[1,2]]); A = V/W; A
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (0)
sage: A.cardinality()
+Infinity
sage: V = QQ^2; W = V.span([[1,2]]); A = V/W; A
Vector space quotient V/W of dimension 1 over Rational Field where
V: Vector space of dimension 2 over Rational Field
W: Vector space of degree 2 and dimension 1 over Rational Field
Basis matrix:
[1 2]
sage: A.cardinality()
+Infinity
coordinate_vector(x, reduce=False)

Return coordinates of x with respect to the optimized representation of self.

INPUT:

  • x – element of self
  • reduce – (default: False); if True, reduce coefficients modulo invariants; this is ignored if the base ring isn’t ZZ.

OUTPUT:

The coordinates as a vector. That is, the same type as self.V(), but in general with fewer entries.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/4,0,0],[3/4,4,2],[0,0,2]],ZZ); W = V.span([4*V.0+12*V.1])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 0, 0)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(-Q.0)
(-1, 0, 0)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(-Q.0, reduce=True)
(3, 0, 0)

If x isn’t in self, it is coerced in:

sage: Q.coordinate_vector(V.0)
(1, 0, -3)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(Q(V.0))
(1, 0, -3)

TESTS:

sage: V = span([[1/2,0,0],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(Q.0 - Q.1)
(1, -1)

sage: O, X = Q.optimized()
sage: O.V()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 2 over Integer Ring
User basis matrix:
[0 0 1]
[0 2 0]
sage: phi = Q.hom([Q.0, 4*Q.1])
sage: x = Q(V.0); x
(0, 4)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(x, reduce=True)
(0, 4)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(-x, reduce=False)
(0, -4)
sage: x == 4*Q.1
True
sage: x = Q(V.1); x
(0, 1)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(x)
(0, 1)
sage: x == Q.1
True
sage: x = Q(V.2); x
(1, 0)
sage: Q.coordinate_vector(x)
(1, 0)
sage: x == Q.0
True
cover()

If this module was constructed as V/W, returns the cover module V. This is the same as self.V().

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.V()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 3 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[1/2   0   0]
[  0   1   0]
[  0   0   1]
gen(i)

Return the i-th generator of self.

INPUT:

  • i – integer

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: Q.gen(0)
(1, 0)
sage: Q.gen(1)
(0, 1)
sage: Q.gen(2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: Generator 2 not defined
sage: Q.gen(-1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: Generator -1 not defined
gens()

Returns tuple of elements \(g_0,...,g_n\) of self such that the module generated by the gi is isomorphic to the direct sum of R/ei*R, where ei are the invariants of self and R is the base ring.

Note that these are not generally uniquely determined, and depending on how Smith normal form is implemented for the base ring, they may not even be deterministic.

This can safely be overridden in all derived classes.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.gens()
((1, 0), (0, 1))
sage: Q.0
(1, 0)
has_canonical_map_to(A)

Return True if self has a canonical map to A, relative to the given presentation of A. This means that A is a finitely generated quotient module, self.V() is a submodule of A.V() and self.W() is a submodule of A.W(), i.e., that there is a natural map induced by inclusion of the V’s. Note that we do not require that this natural map be injective; for this use is_submodule().

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: A = Q.submodule((Q.0, Q.0 + 3*Q.1)); A
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 4)
sage: A.has_canonical_map_to(Q)
True
sage: Q.has_canonical_map_to(A)
False
hom(im_gens, codomain=None, check=True)

Homomorphism defined by giving the images of self.gens() in some fixed fg R-module.

Note

We do not assume that the generators given by self.gens() are the same as the Smith form generators, since this may not be true for a general derived class.

INPUTS:

  • im_gens – a list of the images of self.gens() in some R-module

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: phi = Q.hom([3*Q.1, Q.0])
sage: phi
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12) to module with invariants (4, 12) that sends the generators to [(0, 3), (1, 0)]
sage: phi(Q.0)
(0, 3)
sage: phi(Q.1)
(1, 0)
sage: Q.0 == phi(Q.1)
True

This example illustrates creating a morphism to a free module. The free module is turned into an FGP module (i.e., quotient V/W with W=0), and the morphism is constructed:

sage: V = span([[1/2,0,0],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (2, 0, 0)
sage: phi = Q.hom([0,V.0,V.1]); phi
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants (2, 0, 0) to module with invariants (0, 0, 0) that sends the generators to [(0, 0, 0), (1, 0, 0), (0, 1, 0)]
sage: phi.domain()
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (2, 0, 0)
sage: phi.codomain()
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (0, 0, 0)
sage: phi(Q.0)
(0, 0, 0)
sage: phi(Q.1)
(1, 0, 0)
sage: phi(Q.2) == V.1
True

Constructing two zero maps from the zero module:

sage: A = (ZZ^2)/(ZZ^2); A
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants ()
sage: A.hom([])
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants () to module with invariants () that sends the generators to []
sage: A.hom([]).codomain() is A
True
sage: B = (ZZ^3)/(ZZ^3)
sage: A.hom([],codomain=B)
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants () to module with invariants () that sends the generators to []
sage: phi = A.hom([],codomain=B); phi
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants () to module with invariants () that sends the generators to []
sage: phi(A(0))
()
sage: phi(A(0)) == B(0)
True

A degenerate case:

sage: A = (ZZ^2)/(ZZ^2)
sage: phi = A.hom([]); phi
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants () to module with invariants () that sends the generators to []
sage: phi(A(0))
()

The code checks that the morphism is valid. In the example below we try to send a generator of order 2 to an element of order 14:

sage: V = span([[1/14,3/14],[0,1/2]],ZZ); W = ZZ^2
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (2, 14)
sage: Q.linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens([1,11]).additive_order()
14
sage: f = Q.hom([Q.linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens([1,11]), Q.linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens([1,3])]); f
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: phi must send optimized submodule of M.W() into N.W()
invariants(include_ones=False)

Return the diagonal entries of the smith form of the relative matrix that defines self (see _relative_matrix()) padded with zeros, excluding 1’s by default. Thus if v is the list of integers returned, then self is abstractly isomorphic to the product of cyclic groups \(Z/nZ\) where \(n\) is in \(v\).

INPUT:

  • include_ones – bool (default: False); if True, also include 1’s in the output list.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.invariants()
(4, 12)

An example with 1 and 0 rows:

sage: V = ZZ^3; W = V.span([[1,2,0],[0,1,0], [0,2,0]]); Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (0)
sage: Q.invariants()
(0,)
sage: Q.invariants(include_ones=True)
(1, 1, 0)
is_finite()

Return True if self is finite and False otherwise.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,0,0],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([V.0+2*V.1, 9*V.0+2*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 16)
sage: Q.is_finite()
True
sage: Q = V/V.zero_submodule(); Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (0, 0, 0)
sage: Q.is_finite()
False
is_submodule(A)

Return True if self is a submodule of A. More precisely, this returns True if if self.V() is a submodule of A.V(), with self.W() equal to A.W().

Compare has_canonical_map_to().

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = ZZ^2; W = V.span([[1,2]]); W2 = W.scale(2)
sage: A = V/W; B = W/W2
sage: B.is_submodule(A)
False
sage: A = V/W2; B = W/W2
sage: B.is_submodule(A)
True

This example illustrates that this command works in a subtle cases.:

sage: A = ZZ^1
sage: Q3 = A / A.span([[3]])
sage: Q6 = A / A.span([[6]])
sage: Q6.is_submodule(Q3)
False
sage: Q6.has_canonical_map_to(Q3)
True
sage: Q = A.span([[2]]) / A.span([[6]])
sage: Q.is_submodule(Q6)
True
linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens(x)

Compute a linear combination of the optimised generators of this module as returned by smith_form_gens().

EXAMPLE:

sage: X = ZZ**2 / span([[3,0],[0,2]], ZZ)
sage: X.linear_combination_of_smith_form_gens([1])
(1)
ngens()

Return the number of generators of self.

(Note for developers: This is just the length of gens(), rather than of the minimal set of generators as returned by smith_form_gens(); these are the same in the FGP_Module_class, but not necessarily in derived classes.)

EXAMPLES:

sage: A = (ZZ**2) / span([[4,0],[0,3]], ZZ)
sage: A.ngens()
1

This works (but please don’t do it in production code!)

sage: A.gens = lambda: [1,2,"Barcelona!"]
sage: A.ngens()
3
optimized()

Return a module isomorphic to this one, but with V replaced by a submodule of V such that the generators of self all lift trivially to generators of V. Replace W by the intersection of V and W. This has the advantage that V has small dimension and any homomorphism from self trivially extends to a homomorphism from V.

OUTPUT:

  • Q – an optimized quotient V0/W0 with V0 a submodule of V such that phi: V0/W0 –> V/W is an isomorphism
  • Z – matrix such that if x is in self.V() and c gives the coordinates of x in terms of the basis for self.V(), then c*Z is in V0 and c*Z maps to x via phi above.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: O, X = Q.optimized(); O
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: O.V()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 2 over Integer Ring
User basis matrix:
[0 0 1]
[0 1 0]
sage: O.W()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 2 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[ 0 12  0]
[ 0  0  4]
sage: X
[0 4 0]
[0 1 0]
[0 0 1]
sage: OV = O.V()
sage: Q(OV([0,-8,0])) == V.0
True
sage: Q(OV([0,1,0])) == V.1
True
sage: Q(OV([0,0,1])) == V.2
True
random_element(*args, **kwds)

Create a random element of self=V/W, by creating a random element of V and reducing it modulo W.

All arguments are passed onto the random_element method of V.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.random_element()
(1, 10)
relations()

If this module was constructed as V/W, returns the relations module V. This is the same as self.W().

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.relations()
Free module of degree 3 and rank 3 over Integer Ring
Echelon basis matrix:
[1/2   8   0]
[  0  12   0]
[  0   0   4]
smith_form_gen(i)

Return the i-th generator of self. A private name (so we can freely override gen() in derived classes).

INPUT:

  • i – integer

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: Q.smith_form_gen(0)
(1, 0)
sage: Q.smith_form_gen(1)
(0, 1)
smith_form_gens()

Return a set of generators for self which are in Smith normal form.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W
sage: Q.smith_form_gens()
((1, 0), (0, 1))
sage: [x.lift() for x in Q.smith_form_gens()]
[(0, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0)]
submodule(x)

Return the submodule defined by x.

INPUT:

  • x – list, tuple, or FGP module

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2])
sage: Q = V/W; Q
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 12)
sage: Q.gens()
((1, 0), (0, 1))

We create submodules generated by a list or tuple of elements:

sage: Q.submodule([Q.0])
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4)
sage: Q.submodule([Q.1])
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (12)
sage: Q.submodule((Q.0, Q.0 + 3*Q.1))
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 4)

A submodule defined by a submodule:

sage: A = Q.submodule((Q.0, Q.0 + 3*Q.1)); A
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 4)
sage: Q.submodule(A)
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4, 4)

Inclusion is checked:

sage: A.submodule(Q)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
ValueError: x.V() must be contained in self's V.
sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.is_FGP_Module(x)

Return true of x is an FGP module, i.e., a finitely generated module over a PID represented as a quotient of finitely generated free modules over a PID.

EXAMPLES:

sage: V = span([[1/2,1,1],[3/2,2,1],[0,0,1]],ZZ); W = V.span([2*V.0+4*V.1, 9*V.0+12*V.1, 4*V.2]); Q = V/W
sage: sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.is_FGP_Module(V)
False
sage: sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.is_FGP_Module(Q)
True
sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.random_fgp_module(n, R=Integer Ring, finite=False)

Return a random FGP module inside a rank n free module over R.

INPUT:

  • n – nonnegative integer
  • R – base ring (default: ZZ)
  • finite – bool (default: True); if True, make the random module finite.

EXAMPLES:

sage: import sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module as fgp
sage: fgp.random_fgp_module(4)
Finitely generated module V/W over Integer Ring with invariants (4)
sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.random_fgp_morphism_0(*args, **kwds)

Construct a random fgp module using random_fgp_module, then construct a random morphism that sends each generator to a random multiple of itself. Inputs are the same as to random_fgp_module.

EXAMPLES:

sage: import sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module as fgp
sage: fgp.random_fgp_morphism_0(4)
Morphism from module over Integer Ring with invariants (4,) to module with invariants (4,) that sends the generators to [(0)]
sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module.test_morphism_0(*args, **kwds)

EXAMPLES:

sage: import sage.modules.fg_pid.fgp_module as fgp
sage: s = 0  # we set a seed so results clearly and easily reproducible across runs.
sage: set_random_seed(s); v = [fgp.test_morphism_0(1) for _ in range(30)]
sage: set_random_seed(s); v = [fgp.test_morphism_0(2) for _ in range(30)]
sage: set_random_seed(s); v = [fgp.test_morphism_0(3) for _ in range(10)]
sage: set_random_seed(s); v = [fgp.test_morphism_0(i) for i in range(1,20)]
sage: set_random_seed(s); v = [fgp.test_morphism_0(4) for _ in range(50)]    # long time

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